Yurts of America - Don't Be Square!
Nov 192008

One of my favorite publishers is Shelter Publications of Bolinas, California. Remember the book Shelter (left), which inspired so many handmade houses in the 1960’s and ’70’s? Then came Home Work (right), the pictorial record of 35 years of those inspired handbuilt houses–the ultimate dream book.

Now there’s a new release, Builders of the Pacific Coast.

Reviewer Mike Litchfield says,
…on every page is something shocking and delightful. A boat with legs. A roof like a leaf. A caravan with eyes. A split-cedar woodshed shaped like a bird. Stair rails so sinuous and snakey they might come to life and grab you. Sculpted earth walls. Round windows and arched doors. Roofs curved like seagull wings. Grottos choked with ferns and flowers…
Check it out for yourself at www.shelterpub.com.

Tapered-wall greenhouse

Tapered-wall greenhouse

You’ll also want to see publisher Lloyd Kahn’s blog for more photos of this tapered wall greenhouse (Oct. 31 post), plus wonderful stories of his travels and lots of amazing shelter images.

 

"Stretch" yurt

UK event company Simply Yurts features yurts in magical settings for amazing productions (like a dinner party for 50). Check out this “stretch-yurt” (like a stretch limo) on their new blog



Padma & yurts

Yurts are a natural for artists of all stripes. UK born singer-songwriter Padma has moved into a yurt in Spain’s Pyrenees Mountains in search of simplicity and inspiration. Read Padma’s blog for a window into his life, his thoughts and his yurt experience. You’ll find an innovative thinker and lovely writer…

Yurt raising

Finally, for one woman’s story of putting up a Colorado Yurt Company fabric yurt with friends and family, visit the slideshow at the “Mom’s Yurt” blog. Note that Colorado Yurt Company attaches the trellis wall to the platform using “L” brackets; the use of “I” brackets here was the customer’s innovation. Otherwise this is a typical yurt raising.

Hope all of you in the northern hemisphere are snuggled down in your yurts for the winter–or perhaps in your houses dreaming winter dreams of a yurt of your own…

Wishing you winter’s best,

becky

7 Responses to “Yurts and Blogs…”

  1. jeff farnum says:

    Any ideas for structures to go under a yurt? I mean a conventional first floor stick frame to add rooms and a deck.

  2. becky kemery says:

    Hi Jeff,
    Yes, you can build a conventional stick frame first floor under the yurt. Years ago I visited a community in Arlington, Washington where they had used that approach with numerous fabric yurts. It’s handy for storage or extra rooms, a wood stove and wood supply, root cellar storage (if partially earth bermed), etc.
    I also have friends who live in a yurt with a circular first floor formed out of concrete (see the very first post on this blog, “A Yurt dinner..”). The walls are concrete and the radiant heated floor is concrete as well, with a 30-foot Pacific yurt on top. It’s very comfortable.
    Of course the easiest route is a simple deck around the yurt and a yurt platform just a couple of feet off the ground (which creates a crawl space for installing plumbing or electricity through the floor, if you so choose). Or, to see a pie-shaped platform set on concrete blocks, go to “Lar’s Yurt Page” at http://www.rdrop.com/~glacier/yurtPages/yurtGallery.html.
    Good luck with your yurt project,
    becky

  3. terry Mclaughlin says:

    I hope someone can help me!! I have been using yurts since the early 70’s. Back then , star plates, the size of a small pie plate, with 5 arms, were used as connectors. 11 plates, connected to 25 boards, built the yurt. I need to acquire another set of these plates. They, at one time, were available through Mother Earth News. Have’nt had any success finding them. Can someone help a fella out?? Thanks in advance Terry Mclaughlin, Elmira, NY Feel free to e-mail me

  4. Yurt hire says:

    @ jeff farnum Tongue and groove wood flooring is most often used, however other flooring materials such as tile or linoleum can be installed if a subfloor is laid first. Rigid foam insulation can be used under the yurt floor as well. If keeping the cost down is a concern, a simple plywood floor is a good option. This can be painted or stenciled to add your own special touch.

  5. Yurt hire says:

    Many thanks for these links, I was aware only about the Colorado Yurt family business.

    Cheers!

  6. The creativity in Shelters is just astounding. Thanks for mentioning these resources.

  7. […] Yurts and Blogs… » Living in the Roundjeff farnum says: January 5, 2009 at 4:17 pm. Any ideas for structures to go under a yurt? I mean a conventional first floor stick frame to add rooms and a … […]

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